Foot and Sport Medicine

Foot and Sport Medicine

At Aster RV we cater to a wide range of sports, from cricket to football and basketball. With the aim to help patients return to sports and least re-injury rate with a combination of accurate diagnosis, best in radiology, state of art arthroscopic procedures, short hospital stay and time-bound return to activity.

The common conditions dealt with are

Shoulder

Knee

Ankle

Hip

What is Sports Medicine

Sports medicine, also known as sports and exercise medicine (SEM), is a branch of medicine that deals with physical fitness and the treatment and prevention of injuries related to sports and exercise. The goal of sports medicine is to help people engage in exercise safely and effectively in order to achieve their training goals.

Sports medicine specialists treat a wide range of physical conditions, including acute traumas such as fractures, sprains, strains, and dislocations. They also treat chronic overuse injuries, including tendonitis, degenerative diseases, and overtraining syndrome.

Sports medicine combines general medical education with the specific principles of sports science, exercise physiology, orthopedics, biomechanics, sports nutrition, and even sports psychology.

Aster RV Sports Injury Center team may medical and non-medical specialists, including physicians, surgeons, athletic trainers, sports psychologists, physical therapists, nutritionists, coaches, and personal trainers.

When to call a sports medicine healthcare provider

If a person has a major injury during exercise or sports, it's probably best to seek care right away at an emergency room. Don't wait to see a sports medicine specialist. Signs of a major injury include severe pain, swelling, numbness, and an inability to put any weight on the injured area. If none of these symptoms are present, have patient rest at home and call Aster RV Sports Injury Center for guidance. You may want to ask for a referral to a sports medicine specialist.

Most sports injuries do not need surgery. Treatment for a sports injury can include taking pain relievers, putting ice on the injured area, and keeping it immobilized with a cast or sling. In some cases, surgery may be needed to fix torn tissue or realign bones.

We provide complete sports-related care with an ultimate goal to prevent, treat and rehabilitate sportsmen for all requirements: from pre-participation physicals and injury evaluation to sports nutrition, athletic training and physical therapy

Most sports injuries do not need surgery. Treatment for a sports injury can include taking pain relievers, putting ice on the injured area, and keeping it immobilized with a cast or sling. In some cases, surgery may be needed to fix torn tissue or realign bones.

We provide complete sports-related care with an ultimate goal to prevent, treat and rehabilitate sportsmen for all requirements: from pre-participation physicals and injury evaluation to sports nutrition, athletic training and physical therapy

Services

ACL:

The knee is a hinge joint held together by four ligaments. A ligament is a structure in the knee that holds the bones together and helps to control joint movement or motion. There is a ligament on each side of the knee (the collateral ligaments) and two ligaments deep inside the knee. The two ligaments inside the knee that “cross” each other are called the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Both ligaments

attach on one side to the end of the thigh bone (femur) and on the other to the top of the shinbone (tibia) During the activity, the ACL controls how far forward the tibia can "slide" relative to the femur: it essentially acts to prevent too much forward movement. While some degree of motion or sliding is normal and is required for knee function, too much motion may damage other structures in the knee which can lead to long term problems in some patients.

Injury in the ACL

The ACL can be injured or torn in a number of different ways. The most common mechanism is that of a sudden pivoting or cutting manoeuvre during a sporting activity, which is commonly seen in football, basketball and soccer. The ligament can also tear due to work injuries or automobile accidents.

At the time of the injury, a “pop” or “snap” can sometimes be felt or heard. The amount of pain experienced at the time of the injury is somewhat variable but can be quite severe. Typically, the person is unable to continue play or activity and has the impression that a significant injury has occurred. Immediate swelling of the knee develops at the time of injury—within the first several hours—but the extent of swelling can be limited if the knee is immediately iced or splinted.

Symptoms of an ACL injury or tear

A “pop” in the knee at the time of injury, Swelling of the knee, Inability to bear weight on leg (though some have little or no pain) associated Instability of the knee

Diagnosis

An ACL tear can be diagnosed by a physician through history and physical examination. On physical examination, the physician can specifically assess the amount of motion present and determine if the ACL is torn. Additionally, evaluation of other structures within the knee is done also, as ACL tears are often found in association with injury to other structures within the knee, such as the cartilage and collateral ligaments.

X-rays are taken to evaluate for the presence of any fractures. An MRI scan of the knee may be ordered which is the gold standard for diagnosis. The scan can clarify the question of an ACL tear if the history and examination are inconclusive. The scan is also useful for evaluating the cartilage or meniscus tissue in the knee if this information is necessary to make decisions regarding the best treatment for a specific patient.

Treatment for an ACL injury or tear

Treatment options are based on the patient’s symptoms, examination, the growth remaining in his or her growth plates, type of injury to the ligament, and the type of sports and activity goals.

Nonsurgical

Nonsurgical treatment is most appropriate for grade 1 injuries. This would include immobilization or bracing physical therapy, and a gradual progression back to regular activities and sports.

Surgical

Surgical treatment is recommended for individuals with a grade 3 or complete ACL tear. Surgical options may vary based on the type of ACL injury.

Rehabilitation

After surgery, the patient is made to walk the very next day. This will be followed by rehabilitation which includes muscle strengthening and conditioning and acquiring full ROM. And start contact high velocity sports six month after surgery.

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